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Crossing Swords: Politics and Religion in Mexico by Roderic Ai Camp

By Roderic Ai Camp

According to a decade of box study, this paintings is the 1st book-length, scholarly exam in English of the function of Catholicism in Mexican society because the Nineteen Seventies via 1995, and the expanding political activism of the Catholic church and clergy. it's also the 1st research of church-state family in Latin the United States that includes particular interviews of various bishops and clergy and best politicians approximately how they see one another and the way faith impacts their values. it's also the 1st research of the Mexican Catholic Church which makes use of nationwide survey study to envision Mexican attitudes towards faith, Christianity, and Catholicism, and gives the 1st inside of examine the decision-making means of bishops on the diocesan level.

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Additional resources for Crossing Swords: Politics and Religion in Mexico

Sample text

The national authorities' unwillingness to apply the laws and the degree of resistance among those for whom the laws apply extend well back to the colonial period. "9 Although scholarship on the church-state relationship emphasizes state intolerance toward the Church, in practice, tolerance has long been apparent in the relationship, even as early as the 18708. "1() Prominent politicians agreed. As president Luis Echeverria admitted, "[TJhere is one essential value, tolerance. "11 An important heritage affecting church-state relations in Mexico about which almost nothing has been written is the role of the mayordomo.

These are the laws that actually govern Church behavior and, consequently, its institutional relationship with the state. 106 The Vatican delegate sought the reestablishment of Vatican relations with Mexico as the primary change within the larger reform package. Most clergy who were interviewed prior to 1992 did not consider this an important issue but saw it as a task assigned to the delegate. One could make the argument that initially Salinas purposely avoided relations with the Vatican in recognition of the antagonism between Girolamo Prigione, the delegate, and certain sectors of the episcopate.

Edward L. Cleary, "Politics and Religion—Crisis, Constraints, and Restructuring," in Conflict and Competition, 203. Church and State 21 28. The Church considers voting, in a democracy, as an essential civic responsibility, viewing it as sinful not to participate. In Mexico, increased voter turnout generally has favored the opposition parties. This was not the case, however, in the August 1994 presidential elections. For example, see the comment on this by Otto Granados Roldan, later President Salinas's press secretary, in "La iglesia catolica mexicana como grupo de presion," (Mexico City: UNAM, Departamento de Humanidades, 1981), 52-53.

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