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Documenting the Undocumented: Latino/a Narratives and Social by Marta Caminero-Santangelo

By Marta Caminero-Santangelo

“While the U.S. immigration ‘debate’ turns strident in media circles, Caminero-Santangelo intervenes with a decision to learn rigorously the extra complicated tales that outline us as human and humane.”—Debra A. Castillo, coeditor of Mexican Public Intellectuals
 
“This insightful research brings jointly Latino fiction, journalistic books, and autobiographical money owed to contemplate how undocumented individuals are portrayed within the wake of restrictive immigration policies.”—Rodrigo Lazo, writer of Writing to Cuba: Filibustering and Cuban Exiles within the United States
 
taking a look at the paintings of Junot Díaz, Cristina García, Julia Alvarez, and different Latino/a authors who're U.S. electorate, Marta Caminero-Santangelo examines how writers are more and more expressing their unity with undocumented immigrants. via storytelling, those writers create group and a feeling of peoplehood that incorporates non-citizen Latino/as. This quantity additionally foregrounds the narratives of unauthorized migrants themselves, displaying how their tales are rising into the general public sphere.
           
Immigration and citizenship are multifaceted matters, and the voices are myriad. They problem universal interpretations of “illegal” immigration, discover inevitable traumas and moral dilemmas, protest their very own silencing in immigration debates, or even capitalize at the subject for the industrial industry. but those texts all search to impact political discourse via advancing the potential of empathy throughout traces of ethnicity and citizenship status.
As border enforcement concepts amplify in addition to political rhetoric, detentions, and deaths, those counternarratives are extra major than ever ahead of, and their views can't be missed. What we're witnessing, argues Caminero-Santangelo, is a mass mobilization of reports. This becoming physique of literature is important to figuring out not just the Latino/a immigrant event but additionally substitute visions of kingdom and belonging.
 
 

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Documenting the Undocumented: Latino/a Narratives and Social Justice in the Era of Operation Gatekeeper

“While the U. S. immigration ‘debate’ turns strident in media circles, Caminero-Santangelo intervenes with a choice to learn conscientiously the extra advanced tales that outline us as human and humane. ”—Debra A. Castillo, coeditor of Mexican Public Intellectuals   “This insightful learn brings jointly Latino fiction, journalistic books, and autobiographical bills to contemplate how undocumented everyone is portrayed within the wake of restrictive immigration rules.

Extra resources for Documenting the Undocumented: Latino/a Narratives and Social Justice in the Era of Operation Gatekeeper

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As it calls for political and cultural solidarity in recognizing the traumatized party’s predicament. ” That is, an understanding of an event or historical situation as a form of “cultural trauma” only arises as a result of social narratives that represent it as profoundly damaging, as Erikson might say, to the “basic tissues of social life” and the fundamental bonds of a community: Events are one thing, representations of these events quite another. Trauma is not the result of a group experiencing pain.

It is January 29, 1989. His mother steps off the porch. She walks away. ” Enrique cries, over and over. ” (3–5) The language of the passage is notable for its attempt to “make drama out of the observable world of real people,” as Robert Vare puts it. As an aspect of this narrative mode, the roles of mother and son in the story Narrating the Non-Nation: Literary Journalism and “Illegal” Border Crossings · 45 seem to acquire a universalized quality. S.

Once again, however, this understanding of trauma needs to be modified and expanded to consider not only its effects on the narrative of the individual victim but also on collective cultural narratives—and not only the effects of the traumatic catastrophic event but also those of ongoing, systemic forms of trauma such as colonialism, slavery, or contemporary racism. Cultural trauma, Ron Eyerman writes in his discussion of African American slavery, “refers to a dramatic loss of [group] identity and meaning, a tear in the social fabric, affecting a group of people that has achieved some degree of cohesion” (61); that is, the group’s stories about its own collective identity are interrupted by trauma.

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